• 2017-05-09

    CHINA-PAKISTAN ECONOMIC CORRIDOR - Security Threats & Solutions: A Strategy

    The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is a unique strategic project that promises prosperity in Pakistan and has ushered in a new era of proximity with China. But it is faced with a host of security threats that have the potential to jeopardise it before it takes off or midway. The terrorists would like to hit the state where it hurts the most. Hostile countries, perceiving the CPEC as a threat to their interests and influence, both military and economic, pose a threat to the CPEC. China and Pakistan understand the situation very well and seem determined to leave no stone unturned to provide it protection from all kind of threats. Many measures are already in place for this purpose. However it is strongly felt that a comprehensive plan and proper strategy is needed to ensure perpetual protection to the CPEC. This paper offers a four-pronged strategy, which plugs threats from all four corners to ensure complete security to the Corridor.

  • 2017-05-09

    China-Pakistan Economic Corridor: Impact on Development of Balochistan

    Although, geographically Balochistan is the largest province of Pakistan, demographically it is the smallest and the most under developed federating unit. Careful examination of the lack of progress in Balochistan reveals a worrying situation, which needs to be given the highest precedence by the government. The locals of Balochistan have had numerous reservations, which over the time have developed into anti-nationalistic feelings and a cause of concern for the federation. The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor will be a game changer for Pakistan as a whole and also for Balochistan in particular, as it will usher in a new era of socioeconomic development. This study will examine how this landmark initiative can lead to the economic and social development of Balochistan.

  • 2017-05-09

    Macroeconomic and Welfare Effects of Energy Policies in Saudi Arabia: the MEGIR-SA Model

    MEGIR – Model with Energy, Growth and Intergenerational Redistribution – investigates the long-run implications for growth and equity across generations of different energy policies. It is the first general equilibrium model with overlapping generations to be developed and applied for energy policy analysis in the Arabian Peninsula. The version presented here is parameterized on Saudi data. It is a new and thoroughly revised version of the model developed for western countries by Gonand and Jouvet (2015). It is designed specifically for the economies of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states, particularly insofar as it incorporates an oil-exporting sector and public finances benefiting massively and directly from oil exports.

  • 2017-05-09

    Investing for Energy Productivity in the GCC: Financing the Transition

    An unprecedented infrastructure investment boom occurred in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) in the first part of the 21st century. Strong public capital spending supported by high energy prices provided governments with an opportunity to accelerate economic diversification and infrastructure investment, lifting economic growth and per-capita incomes. The 2014 collapse in oil prices created an added impetus for a transition to a more sustainable growth model, less dependent on volatile energy markets. Given that GCC governments face a constrained fiscal environment and low domestic energy prices remain in place for consumers, we suggest that policymakers consider a market-based 'negabarrel' program to stimulate energy productivity investment. A 'negabarrel' program on the scale of around USD 100 billion across the GCC implemented over 10 years could incentivize private sector investment, generate around 800,000 to 1.2 million new jobs and increase government revenue, if a robust energy service company (ESCO) market can be established. Implementation programs, such as super-ESCOs, need careful planning, but can deliver substantial economic benefits and employment opportunities for GCC citizens in the area of energy auditing and management.

  • 2017-05-09

    Energy Productivity as a New Growth Model for GCC Countries

    The evidence from an international Kuznets curve analysis conducted for this study suggests that greater economic value and per-capita income is possible along a high energy productivity growth pathway. Setting national energy productivity targets would provide a powerful signal on the future direction of government policies and increase transparency to monitor adn evaluate progress. While many advanced economies show strong evidence of having successfully decoupled economic growth from energy consumption along a high energy productivity pathway, GCC countries exhibit this trait only weakly, if at all.

  • 2017-05-09

    Energy Relations and Policymaking in Asia

    Energy security is not a new topic for policymakers in Northeast Asia (NEA). The paradigm usually adopted by both researchers and policymakers has been to view energy security as an asymmetric risk. Energy suppliers worry about security of demand; energy consumers worry about security of supply and often about diversity of supply. Our premise is that it is time to replace this paradigm with a new one. Policymakers can, by adopting a broader view, use these energy relations to reinforce mutual interdependence between economies and reduce the risk asymmetries. These ideas were discussed in a series of workshops held in the GCC and NEA throughout 2015. The result was a collection of papers from 16 different collaborating research institutions on a range of perspectives, with four main themes: the consequences of trade and connectivity, domestic policies, energy security, and energy and the environment. These collected papers are published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2016, under the title Energy Relations and Policy Making in Asia.

  • 2017-05-09

    2016 Global Food Policy Report

    The Global Food Policy Report is IFPRI’s flagship publication. This year’s annual report examines major food policy issues, global and regional developments, and commitments made in 2016, and presents data on key food policy indicators. The report also proposes key policy options for 2017 and beyond to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. In 2016, the global community made major commitments on sustainable development and climate change. The global food system lies at the heart of these commitments—and we will only be able to meet the new goals if we work to transform our food system to be more inclusive, climate-smart, sustainable, efficient, nutrition- and health-driven, and business-friendly.

  • 2017-05-09

    Africa, and China’s One Belt, One Road initiative: Why now and what next?

    China’s growing outbound investment ambitions could be as transformative for today’s poor countries as inbound investment was for China. This will depend upon how recipient developing economies, in particular in Africa, utilise China’s investor interest for their own sustainable development.