• 2017-05-10

    The New Silk Road

  • 2017-05-10

    A More European Russia for a More Secure Europe

    The conflict in Ukraine, which has caused more damage to relations between the West and Russia than any other event since the end of the Cold War, is a focal point of instability that threatens the wellbeing of the EU. The time has come to renew the Union’s strategy towards Russia, an effort that will entail not only the thorough analysis of long-term European objectives needed to make EU policy more efficient and bring it into line with European interests and values, but also a recognition of diplomatic blunders made at the onset of the Ukrainian crisis. Rather than entering into a new Cold War focused on Russian containment, the EU should accept Moscow as the great power that it is and a potential partner in the construction of a space of shared security. The best way to ensure long-term continental security and stability would be for Russia to increasingly feel and become more a part of Europe and for Europe to make a sincere effort to get to know its Russian neighbour better.

  • 2017-05-10

    A new step towards a common European defence

    EU security has reached a critical point unparalleled since the end of the cold war. The threat of Jihadism, instability in Eastern Europe, failing states and human trafficking are problems it must deal with at a moment at which the United States is seeking to play a lesser role in European defence. Although as many as 34 civilian and military operations have been conducted during the 16 years in which the CSDP has been active, this instrument is far from being sufficient to meet the EU's security requirements.

  • 2017-05-10

    Perspectives on Global Development 2014: Boosting Productivity to Meet the Middle-Income Challenge

    The series Perspectives on Global Development assesses the state of play of “Shifting Wealth”, i.e the changing centre of gravity of the world economy from North and West to South and East. The 2014 edition of the report focuses on productivity as a means to overcome the middle-income challenge. Developing economies continue to grow faster than more advanced countries. Non-OECD countries’ share in world GDP surpassed that of OECD countries in 2010. Since its first edition in 2010, the annual Perspectives on Global Development has investigated the trends in “shifting wealth”, the increasing economic weight of developing countries in the world economy. “Shifting wealth” has received a boost through the rise of China, which has also led to positive spillover effects on developing economies that supply China’s demand for resource-based products and intermediates. However, even at their higher rates of growth since 2000, the per capita incomes in developing countries – including many middle-income countries – will not reach the levels of developed countries by 2050. Boosting productivity growth in middle-income countries could stem this trend and is the focus of this report. At the same time, this growth needs to be inclusive so that a real convergence in living standards can take place.

  • 2017-05-10

    African Economic Outlook 2016: Sustainable Cities and Structural Transformation

    The African Economic Outlook 2016 presents the continent’s current state of affairs and forecasts its situation for the coming two years. This annual report examines Africa’s performance in crucial areas: macroeconomics, financing, trade policies and regional integration, human development, and governance. For its 15th edition, the African Economic Outlook takes a hard look at urbanisation and structural transformation in Africa and proposes practical steps to foster sustainable cities. A section of country notes summarises recent economic growth, forecasts gross domestic product for 2016 and 2017, and highlights the main policy issues facing each of the 54 African countries. A statistical annex compares country-specific economic, social and political variables.

  • 2017-05-09

    CHINA-PAKISTAN ECONOMIC CORRIDOR - Security Threats & Solutions: A Strategy

    The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is a unique strategic project that promises prosperity in Pakistan and has ushered in a new era of proximity with China. But it is faced with a host of security threats that have the potential to jeopardise it before it takes off or midway. The terrorists would like to hit the state where it hurts the most. Hostile countries, perceiving the CPEC as a threat to their interests and influence, both military and economic, pose a threat to the CPEC. China and Pakistan understand the situation very well and seem determined to leave no stone unturned to provide it protection from all kind of threats. Many measures are already in place for this purpose. However it is strongly felt that a comprehensive plan and proper strategy is needed to ensure perpetual protection to the CPEC. This paper offers a four-pronged strategy, which plugs threats from all four corners to ensure complete security to the Corridor.

  • 2017-05-09

    China-Pakistan Economic Corridor: Impact on Development of Balochistan

    Although, geographically Balochistan is the largest province of Pakistan, demographically it is the smallest and the most under developed federating unit. Careful examination of the lack of progress in Balochistan reveals a worrying situation, which needs to be given the highest precedence by the government. The locals of Balochistan have had numerous reservations, which over the time have developed into anti-nationalistic feelings and a cause of concern for the federation. The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor will be a game changer for Pakistan as a whole and also for Balochistan in particular, as it will usher in a new era of socioeconomic development. This study will examine how this landmark initiative can lead to the economic and social development of Balochistan.